Category Archives: Standardized Testing

Repercussions for districts and students who opt out of state tests

APRIL 11, 2016 – Parents Opt Out of Georgia Milestones
Kay Draper Hutchinson, a former school counselor, recently published these thoughts and instructions on how to opt out of the Georgia Milestones.

MAY 15, 2014 – Georgia’s movement to opt out of high stakes tests gains momentum
A small but increasingly vocal group of parents in Georgia are urging state leaders to give their children the choice to “opt out” of taking the high-stakes tests in schools without being penalized for doing so.


School administrators ask students to take the Georgia Milestones

standardized testing
Georgia Legislation

Last year the state did not enforce Georgia statute requiring grade level performance on the state standardized tests for graduation or promotion to the next grade in 3rd, 5th and 8th grades. It is unclear if the state will waive those requirements again.

While school district administrators want to serve the public, they must also follow the law. The path of least resistance is to encourage students and parents to not opt out of the Georgia Milestones standardized tests.

Tim Jarboe, director of assessment and accountability for the Clarke County School District, makes a plea to the public to not opt out of the Georgia Milestones.

In Georgia, state law has authorized heavy penalties for those who don’t take the tests, according to Jarboe.

Laws are changing, but for now, the old rules remain in effect.

In high school, the so-called “Georgia Milestones” end-of-course tests count as final exams, and are worth 20 percent of the course grade, Jarboe told a recent meeting of the Clarke County Parent Advisory Board.

If students don’t take the test, they lose those points, and “such a student would receive a grade that does not reflect his or her true achievement,” Jarboe said.
In elementary and middle schools, students in grades 3, 5 and 8 who opt out of testing in reading and math are counted as failing, though parents can appeal.

Opting out can also affect the scores teachers, administrators and schools get in a grading system the state has instituted, Jarboe said.

Test scores count for 50 percent of a teacher’s grade and 70 percent of an administrators’ grade; students opting out of testing could affect those scores either up or down, depending on whether the students opting out might have scored high or low on the Milestones.

And schools where fewer than 95 percent of students take a test can’t get any “achievement points” from the state in that particular subject area. Those achievement points are part of a complex formula the state uses to gauge how well schools are performing, called the “College and Career Ready Performance Index,” or CCRPI.

“Low CCRPI scores can lead to the federal designation as a “Focus” or “Priority” school, which creates a layer of mandates that the school is required to implement or can lead to the placement on the “Opportunity School District” list if the OSD constitutional amendment is passed next November,” Jarboe wrote in an email.

Neither the Georgia Department of Education nor the local board of education has the authority to waive the testing requirements set forth by the legislature, Jarboe said.

School principals will work with parents who want to opt their children out, he said.

“Public school leaders are literally ‘caught in the middle’ as they are technically required to follow federal and state mandates in regards to student participation in state testing programs and working with parents to honor the parent’s concern about the socio-emotional welfare of their children and how high-stakes testing affects their child,” Jarboe said. “Our principals work very hard to make sure that the decision about testing does not negatively affect the child.”

And according to the Georgia Department of Education website, it’s important for students to take the standardized tests:

“State tests are critical for measuring student learning and ensuring that all of Georgia’s students receive a high-quality education,” according to the Georgia DOE. “The results from state tests provide the public with much needed information about how all students are performing. Student test scores are the foundation of Georgia’s College and Career Readiness Index (CCRPI) and district/school report cards, which are designed to show parents, taxpayers, communities, and school leaders how well students are achieving. Allowing for comparisons between districts and schools is important given the amount of public tax dollars spent to support Georgia’s public education system.”

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Parents Opt Out of Georgia Milestones

standardized testing
Georgia Legislation

The Georgia Legislature passed SB 355 this year allowing parents to opt out of the Georgia Milestones for medical reasons.  Georgia statute says 3rd, 5th and 8th graders must pass a portion of the state standardized tests to be promoted to the next grade.

However, the promotion requirements have always been routinely ignored says state education department spokesman Matt Cardoza saying, “Students who failed those tests in the past could appeal to local panels, which often approved the students’ promotion”.

If you withdraw your child or homeschool them, they don’t have to pass any tests for promotion.

Kay Draper Hutchinson, a former school counselor, has co-founded a group called “PACT with Tact,” laying out what she believes are misconceptions about the exams and the concerns that she and other parents have about them.  She recently published these thoughts and instructions on how to opt out of the Georgia Milestones.

By: Kay Draper Hutchinson

SPRING BREAK has come to an end, and TESTING SEASON in public schools now begins in earnest. You may not realize how much the testing culture has taken over, but it has. If for any reason you do not want your child to participate in the Milestones testing that stretches over several days, you can refuse the tests on your child’s behalf without consequence (not true for high schoolers because the state legislature ties the mandated tests to each course grade to the tune of 20%).

In Georgia, state-administered tests begin this week for children in grades 3-8 who attend public schools. Thanks to mandates from the state legislature and enticements from USDOE (all in cooperation with profiteers with their eyes on the money to be made in the public ed sector), the focus of early childhood and middle years education is now on these and other tests. The children are increasingly seen as data and the teachers, principals and other employees struggle to maintain conditions that are good for kids when the high stakes attached to all this data affect their very livelihoods. Some parents across the country, all in similar circumstances, have decided to opt out or refuse this testing in order to decrease undue stress, protest the overzealous and punitive system, and lobby for a return to common sense, low stakes assessment as a minor piece of a child’s school experience (see NY for massive opt out movement).

If you don’t want your child to participate, here is what you do-

1) Write the principal and copy your child’s teachers (if you prefer, write them separately to explain that you support them but cannot continue to support high stakes testing). Say the following:

“While I understand that the district must offer the Georgia Milestones to all students, I hereby acknowledge that offer and refuse testing on behalf of my minor child________. Please provide a supervised, alternate location for my child to wait each day while testing is underway. We will provide our child with reading materials and other quiet, self-directed activities. Please forward this email to the appropriate leaders at the district level (In Fulton County Schools, Connie Maggert is the director of assessment). In addition, please acknowledge receipt of this email and provide information I can share with my child about where the students who are not participating in testing will wait.”

2) Prepare your child with a backpack of materials each day of testing: high interest reading material, crossword puzzles/mazes/sudoko, crayons/colored pencils/paper, snacks, cards, etc.

3) Understand that if your child is in grades 4,6, or 7, that is the end of the process. If anyone at the school says not testing could affect placement for next year, let them know that you expect them to use all the other data they have (believe me there is plenty), and that you are aware that parents can waive their children into a different placement if you think it is best.

4) Understand that if your child is in grades 3,5, or 8, you will receive a letter indicating there is a state mandate that students in grades 3,5, and 8 must pass portions of the Milestones in order to be automatically promoted. Therefore, your child’s other performance data will be considered in order to determine promotion. The VITAL INFO in this regard is as follows: IF YOUR CHILD WAS NOT OTHERWISE IN DANGER OF BEING RETAINED, THEY WILL NOT BE RETAINED DUE TO NONPARTICIPATION IN THE MILESTONES.

5) Other thoughts: Some schools are permitting the older children to spend time in a classroom of children who are not taking the Milestones. For example, one child I know will be helping in her former Kindergarten classroom.

6) If you want to know more, like the Facebook page called PACTWITHTACT, search for and join the group Opt Out Fulton/PWT Test Refusal, and search for and join the group Opt Out Georgia. You will see a flyer on PACTWITHTACT page for an Opt Out Georgia meeting tomorrow night in North Fulton area.

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Georgia’s A-F Grading of Schools

In April this year, Georgia Governor Nathan Deal signed into law a bill to create an A-F school grading system for Georgia schools (SB 133). A, B, C, D, or F will be assigned to each public elementary and secondary school based on student achievement, achievement gap closure, and student growth. Schools earning an F for at least three consecutive years will qualify for the new Opportunity School District. The OSD will take in a maximum of 20 schools per year, with no more than 100 at any given time, and will have jurisdiction over these schools for a minimum of 5 years and a maximum of 10 years.

Kelly Cadman is a parent and teacher at Brighten Academy Charter School. In this essay, she explains why she supports Georgia’s new A-F school grading system.

By: Kelly Cadman

Politicians may talk a big game about education, but at the end of the day, no one has the same stake in my children’s future that I do. As a parent, I’m ultimately responsible for ensuring my two boys, aged 11 and 16, are prepared for all the opportunities and challenges that life brings. I am also a teacher, and I believe that responsibility extends to my students.

But how are we parents supposed to know what happens in our kids’ schools? We can’t do anything to help if we don’t know their schools are struggling. Even the most involved parents can miss major problems in the classroom, because we can’t be there every day. That is why I’m excited about the new A-F school grading system in Georgia.

The new system, which was signed into law by Gov. Nathan Deal earlier this year and will be released in 2016, raises the bar in education in three critically important areas. Here is where the teacher in me kicks in.

First and foremost, A-F school grading prioritizes excellence over the complacency in the old system. There should be no greater goal in education than academic success. Through the simplicity of A-F letter grades, parents can quickly identify problematic trends at their children’s school and get engaged to help turn them around.

Secondly, according to other states that have implemented A-F school grading, this urgency prompts entire communities to come together to tackle the problems of a given school. Across the nation, parents, teachers and community leaders are rejecting mediocrity and the status quo, and dedicating themselves to improving student achievement.

Just like a report card helps me understand how my child is doing academically, A-F grades will give me a better idea of how their schools are performing. And the increase of public attention surrounding the release of the grades will inspire pride in successful schools and unleash a competitive fire in struggling schools committed to doing better.

While the new A-F school grading system provides more accountability and transparency in education, that does not mean it is perfect. And as parents, teachers and community leaders, we must continue to push to refine the system to improve student achievement.

The debate over education reform is never an easy one. Many of us parents sincerely love our children’s teachers and know that our schools are working harder than ever to provide our children with an education that prepares them for success. As a teacher, I am striving each day to set my students up for success. But this is a debate worth having, because how we educate our children today will determine not just their future, but the future of our entire state.

As a mother of two children and teacher to 27 students, I choose reform. And it is my belief that Georgia’s new A-F school grading policy will help create an education system that is second to none.

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Georgia will decide “teach to the test” under changed federal law

With the stroke of a pen, President Barack Obama will end an era of high-stakes school testing mandated by Washington, appeasing parents, teachers and educational leaders who bemoaned a fearful “teach to the test” environment it created in some schools.

When he signs the Every Student Succeeds Act, the oft-criticized annual tests will not vanish, but states will no longer be required to impose heavy sanctions on schools with poor scores.
Georgia will decide school testing under changed federal law photo
“You still have testing but it reduces the mandate and gives the local boards of education and states the ability to let parents opt out,” said U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., who helped write the legislation. Congress passed it by overwhelming, bipartisan margins in both chambers, and the White House said Obama would sign it Thursday morning.

Georgia already makes its school districts give more tests than the federal government requires, and this legislation won’t force states to reduce their own mandates, said Isakson, who also helped write the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act that this law replaces. The new law “takes away the argument that the federal government is making the states do it and puts it totally in the hands of the states,” he said.

It is seen as a retreat from federal school oversight that grew out of the civil rights movement, yet it is being hailed as a success by the Obama administration and even, more guardedly, by civil rights proponents. They feared the return of an era when schools were given a pass for poor performance among high-poverty and minority populations, but said they lobbied successfully to retain safeguards.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan said that, unlike the “top-down, one-size fits all approach” of the past, the new law lets states “find the best local solutions” to improve struggling schools and requires progress reports to the federal government.

The No Child law threatened to restructure schools that didn’t measure up, and it required reports on the academic performance of demographic groups, becoming known derisively as the “test-and-punish” law.

The tests created a pressure cooker environment in some schools, especially those with lots of impoverished students. Educators involved in the worst cheating scandal in the nation, here in Atlanta, blamed pressure to raise test scores when they testified in the trial that ended earlier this year, though the targets set by Atlanta Public Schools were often higher than those required by Washington.

Teachers’ advocates hailed the Senate’s 85-12 vote Wednesday and the House’s vote the week before. Sid Chapman, president of the Georgia Association of Educators, an affiliate of the National Educators Association, called it “a victory for every child in Georgia.” Lily Eskelsen García, the president of the national group, warned states not to implement or continue policies that are as punitive as the federal mandates that drew a backlash from teachers and parents. What happened in Congress is “a cautionary tale now for the state legislatures,” she said.

Meanwhile, Gov. Nathan Deal said recently that he’s ready to ask lawmakers to tie teacher pay to performance using both an “objective assessment” and “subjective” measures. He didn’t say whether that means using high-stakes tests, but the state is poised to do just that, with an evaluation system based on test scores and classroom observations by supervisors.

Georgia school leaders said some testing is necessary but that they want less of it and less emphasis on the results in teacher reviews.

Julia Bernath, a member of the Fulton County school board, said tests should be used to assess students’ progress while teachers should be judged on their ability to prepare them for the next grade.

“Absolutely reduce the amount of testing,” she said. Will Wade, a Dawson County school board member and president-elect of the state school boards association, said tests should count for maybe a fifth of teachers’ evaluations, instead of half as is currently planned. Philip Lanoue, superintendent of the Clarke County School District in Athens and the national superintendent of the year, said standardized tests are necessary but lawmakers should trust school districts to determine how many and how to use them.

“I think the state needs to drastically cut back and only do what the federal government requires,” he said. “The biggest question is what our state is going to do.”

The new law continues the federal mandate that students be tested in math and reading in grades three through eight, plus once in high school. Georgia requires more testing in other subjects. State lawmakers, who convene for the next legislative session in January, haven’t charted a course yet.

Sen. Lindsey Tippins, chairman of the state senate’s Education and Youth Committee, said tests are necessary to determine how students are doing, but he also said Georgia students spend too much time taking them. He said more efficiency could be the path forward: getting more information from each test while reducing the total number.

“If you streamline the design you could cut down the number of times that a student has to sit down and take a test,” said Tippins, R-Marietta. He said there’s a good argument for maintaining tests in teacher evaluations, since strong results could protect teachers against poor evaluations by bosses influenced by personal conflict.

Before Tippins commits to any changes, he wants to see how federal rule makers interpret the new legislation and how Deal reacts.

State Superintendent Richard Woods said Georgia needs to strike a balance with testing. He has called for a survey of state and local tests to ferret out “unnecessary” exams and “provide relief from over-testing and over-burdensome accountability.”

There are defenders of high-stakes testing, including the national group Students First, a nonprofit organization that contends America is in an educational crisis. Tests are a key accountability tool, said the group’s Georgia director, Michael O’Sullivan. He said Georgia’s new set of tests, the Milestones, give a better picture of student ability than those they replaced, and said the way the state now tracks each student’s scores over time and compares the change against those of similar students is a fairer method of measuring the influence of each teacher.

“It’s about student growth. It’s about being able to more accurately identify teachers who have moved students along,” O’Sullivan said.

Despite her criticism of testing, Bernath, the Fulton school board member, said the No Child law was a positive force because it exposed how some groups were undeserved, especially impoverished children and minorities.

“What No Child Left Behind did was force districts to find those children who weren’t being served and give them the education they needed,” she said.

Isakson said it was a good law that ultimately went too far. It mandated ever-increasing levels of performance until the bar was set impossibly high. Then, Congress failed to reauthorize it and the mandates stayed in place for nearly a decade. He blames the Atlanta Public Schools cheating scandal mainly on immoral educators and a lack of school district leadership, but said the punitive federal law “may have contributed to the APS problem.”

A coalition of civil rights organizations lobbied him and other members of Congress to maintain federal oversight over school quality in this new 1,000-plus page law.

“The final product is not everything that we wanted it to be,” said Liz King, the education policy director for The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, which coordinated the effort. Her group takes solace that the federal government maintains an oversight role and that the law compels states to report how much money is spent per child in each school, a new requirement that she said will expose inequities.

“More control and authority is ceded than we would have liked,” King said, “but much less than we had feared would happen.”


What the Every Student Succeeds Act does:

  • Minimum federal testing mandates remain: states must test for math and reading in grades three through eight and once in high school, with less frequent exams in science, and must publicly report the results broken down by demographic groups.
  • But states determine how to use the results. No Child Left Behind eventually required 100 percent proficiency in math and reading, which proved an impossible goal for many schools.
  • The new law strips the U.S. education secretary of the authority to pressure states into agreements like one in Georgia that requires an evaluation of teachers using test scores. That agreement becomes null and void, but state law still requires the evaluations and it’s unclear whether that will change.
  • Schools performing at the bottom 5 percent or that fail to graduate at least a third of students are targeted for special attention. States get to decide what kind of attention, though.
  • The new law introduces new reporting requirements, such as a school-by-school analysis of per pupil expenditures.

Ty Tagami
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

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Milestones Results – Distinguished Learners – All Georgia Elementary Schools

While Proficient Learners are at grade level, Distinguished Learners are students identified by the 2015 Milestones tests who demonstrated advanced proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary, as specified in Georgia’s content standards.

Milestones Results – Distinguished Learners
Milestones Results – Georgia Elementary School Rankings – Distinguished Learners

Milestones Results – Proficient Learners
Milestones Results – Georgia Elementary School Rankings – Proficient Learners
Milestones Results – Georgia High School Rankings – Proficient Learners
Milestones Results – DeKalb Elementary Schools – Proficient Learners
Milestones Results – DeKalb Middle Schools – Proficient Learners
 Milestones Results – Metro Atlanta School Districts – Proficient Learners  (Elementary and Middle School)

The following table ranks All Georgia Elementary Schools by the percentage of Distinguished Learners identified by the 2015 Milestones Tests.

Grade Size – Grade size is determined by the average number of students that take each exam in that grade level.

enlarge   View All 1260 Georgia Elementary Schools Distinguished Learners Milestone Results

Georgia Elementary School Rankings Distinguished Learners
3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade
County School Grade
Size
ELA Math Science History ELA Math Science History ELA Math Science History AVG
1 DEKALB KITTREDGE MAG 151 54 46 48 51 54 46 48 51 49.8
2 FORSYTH DAVES CREEK ES 198 49 48 34 46 51 52 32 47 51 52 32 47 45.1
3 FULTON FINDLEY OAKS ES 107 40 43 38 46 41 45 45 45 41 45 45 45 43.2
4 FORSYTH BIG CREEK ES 152 50 45 46 58 41 41 31 43 41 41 31 43 42.4
5 FORSYTH BROOKWOOD ES 165 39 40 34 46 40 56 36 33 40 56 36 33 40.6
6 MUSCOGEE BRITT DAVID ES 102 54 47 42 64 42 41 21 33 42 41 21 33 39.9
7 FORSYTH SETTLES BRIDGE 177 33 35 30 30 48 51 35 41 48 51 35 41 39.9
8 FULTON WILSON CREEK 145 53 54 45 54 37 39 26 21 37 39 26 21 37.8
9 FULTON FULTON SUNSHINE 89 24 25 26 34 43 52 45 31 43 52 45 31 37.5
10 MARIETTA CITY MARIETTA CENTER 105 41 34 38 46 39 33 25 48 39 33 25 48 37.4
11 FORSYTH SHARON ES 179 50 42 39 50 29 39 29 36 29 39 29 36 37.3
12 FORSYTH JOHNS CREEK ES 171 46 46 28 28 39 43 24 40 39 43 24 40 36.7
13 FAYETTE KEDRON ES 87 32 21 30 38 31 39 40 39 31 39 40 39 35.0
14 APS MORNINGSIDE ES 130 32 27 49 52 29 33 37 29 29 33 37 29 34.7
15 FULTON ABBOTTS HILL 118 44 36 39 42 36 33 30 27 36 33 30 27 34.4
16 GWINNETT RIVERSIDE ES 189 34 27 33 36 36 34 32 37 36 34 32 37 33.9
17 APS JACKSON ES 139 30 21 29 34 39 33 27 47 39 33 27 47 33.8
18 GWINNETT SIMPSON ES 137 33 15 31 15 38 35 29 51 38 35 29 51 33.5
19 FULTON HEARDS FERRY ES 105 37 33 33 23 34 42 26 33 34 42 26 33 32.9
20 APS SPRINGDALE PARK 105 36 25 35 38 46 36 23 27 46 36 23 27 32.9
21 FULTON LAKE WINDWARD 115 33 38 36 36 36 37 26 26 36 37 26 26 32.8
22 FULTON SWEET APPLE ES 121 24 28 31 30 31 41 32 35 31 41 32 35 32.5
23 DEKALB VANDERLYN ES 111 45 38 52 46 26 34 19 23 26 34 19 23 32.1
24 FULTON CRABAPPLE CROSS 134 25 32 46 38 38 25 27 27 38 25 27 27 31.5
25 COBB SOPE CREEK ES 177 38 28 28 20 31 40 20 37 31 40 20 37 30.6
26 COBB TIMBER RIDGE ES 106 30 20 33 16 36 36 27 34 36 36 27 34 30.3
27 DECATUR CITY OAKHURST ES 125 33 22 34 32 30.3
28 DEKALB WADSWORTH MAG 80 50 14 30 26 50 14 30 26 30.0
29 COBB MOUNT BETHEL 167 40 24 44 21 35 30 21 28 35 30 21 28 29.6
30 FULTON SHAKERAG ES 138 34 43 33 28 31 38 19 19 31 38 19 19 29.3
31 GLYNN OGLETHORPE PT E 92 24 25 29 29 29 32 26 35 29 32 26 35 29.2
32 GWINNETT LEVEL CREEK ES 158 29 27 28 44 27 33 20 31 27 33 20 31 29.2
33 DECATUR CITY WESTCHESTER ELE 37 16 22 30 49 29.1
34 GWINNETT SUWANEE ES 123 25 27 22 27 22 40 28 32 22 40 28 32 28.7
35 DEKALB OAK GROVE ES 96 28 32 28 32 27 27 25 33 27 27 25 33 28.6
36 GWINNETT PARSONS ES 137 36 23 32 32 29 32 21 29 29 32 21 29 28.6
37 APS LIN ES 105 35 21 26 21 30 39 24 25 30 39 24 25 28.3
38 FULTON STATE BRIDGE 147 40 22 36 27 32 31 23 20 32 31 23 20 28.0
39 GWINNETT CAMP CREEK ES 165 29 21 30 27 27 24 24 40 27 24 24 40 28.0
40 FULTON DOLVIN ES 152 33 28 34 24 35 33 21 19 35 33 21 19 28.0
41 APS BRANDON ES 179 27 15 29 38 39 31 23 21 39 31 23 21 27.9
42 FORSYTH SHILOH POINT ES 217 34 33 26 32 25 38 18 24 25 38 18 24 27.9
43 DEKALB AUSTIN ES 87 33 26 35 29 31 26 21 28 31 26 21 28 27.9
44 DECATUR CITY NEW GLENNWOOD 72 22 14 44 29 27.4
45 HEARD EPHESUS ES 18 6 0 13 13 26 32 47 42 26 32 47 42 27.2
46 FULTON OCEE ES 120 30 21 19 16 31 33 30 23 31 33 30 23 26.7
47 WALKER FAIRYLAND ES 34 30 13 33 43 22 33 22 22 22 33 22 22 26.7
48 FORSYTH G W WHITLOW ES 170 19 20 19 23 35 34 22 28 35 34 22 28 26.4
49 FORSYTH HAW CREEK ES 188 30 23 20 31 29 31 16 29 29 31 16 29 26.2
50 FULTON MEDLOCK BRIDGE 117 39 43 27 20 19 27 18 27 19 27 18 27 26.0
51 APS SMITH ES 179 31 25 28 44 27 26 16 22 27 26 16 22 25.9
52 DEKALB FERNBANK ES 106 37 26 50 28 29 17 15 23 29 17 15 23 25.8
53 OCONEE OCONEE ES 154 30 32 34 41 21 34 18 13 21 34 18 13 25.6
54 GWINNETT MULBERRY ES 103 24 25 26 29 19 25 17 40 19 25 17 40 25.5
55 FULTON CREEK VIEW ES 153 33 29 25 35 25 34 17 16 25 34 17 16 25.4
56 GWINNETT BROOKWOOD ES 209 29 19 22 31 23 21 20 38 23 21 20 38 25.4
57 BREMEN CITY BREMEN ACAD 162 22 28 28 24 22 28 28 24 25.3
58 DECATUR CITY CLAIREMONT ES 88 25 15 33 28 25.2
59 CLARKE CHASE STREET 59 28 28 38 29 24 20 24 20 24 20 24 20 25.0
60 FAYETTE PEEPLES ES 113 25 21 22 25 24 27 25 26 24 27 25 26 24.9
61 COBB TRITT ES 169 55 23 31 31 30 19 13 15 30 19 13 15 24.4
62 GREENE LAKE OCONEE CH 54 45 32 32 33 12 22 18 24 12 22 18 24 24.2
63 COBB FORD ES 114 36 20 22 28 23 27 16 24 23 27 16 24 23.9
64 MARIETTA CITY WEST SIDE ES 68 30 29 29 38 17 30 13 21 17 30 13 21 23.8
65 FULTON COGBURN WOODS 161 30 30 28 40 22 24 20 12 22 24 20 12 23.7
66 COBB EAST SIDE ES 205 35 26 29 19 26 27 20 14 26 27 20 14 23.6
67 FULTON SUMMIT HILL ES 136 34 33 35 26 25 22 14 17 25 22 14 17 23.6
68 HOUSTON LAKE JOY ES 201 27 18 28 33 22 22 22 20 22 22 22 20 23.5
69 GWINNETT BURNETTE ES 117 25 20 22 18 31 25 15 26 31 25 15 26 23.2
70 OCONEE MALCOM ES 90 17 20 18 19 17 23 30 32 17 23 30 32 23.2
71 GWINNETT GWIN OAKS ES 181 25 26 25 28 19 27 21 20 19 27 21 20 23.1
72 FORSYTH KELLY MILL ES 208 32 23 25 25 28 30 13 14 28 30 13 14 23.0
73 DEKALB DUNWOODY ES 121 26 23 30 28 30 23 20 11 30 23 20 11 22.8
74 COBB MURDOCK ES 148 32 27 29 29 24 18 11 25 24 18 11 25 22.8
75 RICHMOND WALKER TRADIT 89 37 11 31 29 19 23 19 22 19 23 19 22 22.7
76 COLUMBIA STEVENS CREEK 137 24 26 28 44 19 21 21 14 19 21 21 14 22.6
77 FORSYTH MASHBURN ES 93 25 22 24 24 27 22 13 26 27 22 13 26 22.6
78 DEKALB MUSEUM SCHOOL A 64 29 19 31 25 27 22 13 18 27 22 13 18 22.0
79 DECATUR CITY WINNONA PARK 87 24 14 21 27 21.3
80 COLUMBIA RIVER RIDGE ES 128 20 13 27 22 21 30 17 20 21 30 17 20 21.3
81 FULTON NORTHWOOD ES 121 21 22 27 30 22 21 17 18 22 21 17 18 21.2
82 FULTON NEW PROSPECT E 89 22 29 17 17 24 27 18 16 24 27 18 16 21.2
83 GWINNETT HEAD ES 87 30 15 26 27 25 20 13 17 25 20 13 17 20.8
84 COBB SHALLOWFORD F 107 31 22 22 17 24 21 16 17 24 21 16 17 20.8
85 FULTON MOUNTAIN PARK E 141 26 24 30 42 22 23 9 10 22 23 9 10 20.8
86 GWINNETT CRAIG ES 176 27 19 32 18 19 20 17 19 19 20 17 19 20.7
87 FULTON SPALDING DRIVE 75 16 14 23 19 35 23 15 16 35 23 15 16 20.7
88 BRYAN RICHMONDHILL ES 465 14 17 25 27 20.7
89 FAYETTE PEACHTREE CITY 92 29 22 35 12 19 22 20 13 19 22 20 13 20.5
90 GLYNN ST SIMONS ES 86 16 11 10 14 18 27 30 23 18 27 30 23 20.5
91 GWINNETT CHATTAHOOCHEE E 175 20 16 20 19 23 28 15 19 23 28 15 19 20.4
92 GWINNETT ROBERTS ES 138 21 16 18 12 21 24 19 24 21 24 19 24 20.3
93 FAYETTE CRABAPPLE LAN 103 23 12 20 32 25 9 20 23 25 9 20 23 20.2
94 FORSYTH VICKERY CREEK E 214 26 23 22 19 19 21 14 20 19 21 14 20 19.7
95 DECATUR CITY FIFTH AVENUE 339 22 21 15 20 22 21 15 20 19.5
96 GWINNETT W J COOPER ES 201 25 24 27 29 14 21 14 15 14 21 14 15 19.5
97 FAYETTE BRAELINN ES 90 30 27 23 24 19 17 16 12 19 17 16 12 19.4
98 GWINNETT M H MASON ES 152 22 19 18 17 18 27 18 15 18 27 18 15 19.4
99 GWINNETT HARBINS ES 171 15 14 20 16 22 23 11 27 22 23 11 27 19.1
100 GWINNETT PUCKETT S MILL 177 20 20 15 24 26 18 14 17 26 18 14 17 19.1
101 OCONEE HIGH SHOALS ES 77 23 25 24 18 14 18 14 22 14 18 14 22 19.0
102 HOUSTON BONAIRE ES 119 29 30 23 25 15 18 19 9 15 18 19 9 19.0
103 APS NEIGHBORHOOD 72 18 10 26 21 25 21 6 25 25 21 6 25 19.0
104 GWINNETT TAYLOR ES 164 16 19 23 32 17 15 17 20 17 15 17 20 18.9
105 CHATHAM JACOB G SMITH E 78 18 14 24 24 20 10 15 27 20 10 15 27 18.8
106 GWINNETT IVY CREEK ES 152 23 13 19 24 20 18 16 19 20 18 16 19 18.7
107 OCONEE ROCKY BRANCH ES 122 20 18 27 24 15 19 14 20 15 19 14 20 18.7
108 FULTON BARNWELL ES 132 31 29 25 9 18 23 10 13 18 23 10 13 18.7
109 COBB KEMP ES 193 22 14 21 15 26 16 13 21 26 16 13 21 18.6
110 CHATHAM HOWARD ES 117 16 15 21 16 16 24 11 26 16 24 11 26 18.5
111 FULTON ALPHARETTA ES 91 19 15 20 26 15 28 13 14 15 28 13 14 18.4
112 FULTON HEMBREE SPRINGS 131 26 18 23 26 18 21 13 11 18 21 13 11 18.4
113 DEKALB MONTGOMERY ES 96 33 24 25 25 23 13 9 11 23 13 9 11 18.3
114 COWETA ARBOR SPRINGS 65 18 14 12 15 21 24 15 20 21 24 15 20 18.2
115 COWETA CHARTER COWETA CHARTER 94 16 17 24 8 27 11 16 21 27 11 16 21 17.9
116 GWINNETT FREEMAN S MILL 155 25 12 25 29 16 15 14 16 16 15 14 16 17.7
117 GWINNETT SUGAR HILL ES 220 22 12 19 12 21 20 13 18 21 20 13 18 17.6
118 TROUP HILLCREST ES 60 14 12 13 20 13 20 20 24 13 20 20 24 17.5
119 COBB MOUNTAIN VIEW 151 20 11 27 15 23 21 10 14 23 21 10 14 17.5
120 GWINNETT DUNCAN CREEK E 204 25 17 19 21 21 21 11 10 21 21 11 10 17.4
121 JACKSON EAST ES 72 16 15 26 22 15 13 13 23 15 13 13 23 17.4
122 JONES DAMES FERRY ES 89 15 12 13 12 13 20 24 22 13 20 24 22 17.3
123 COLUMBIA GREENBRIER ES 174 29 15 32 24 8 14 14 18 8 14 14 18 17.3
124 FORSYTH CHATTAHOOCHEE E 133 18 19 22 24 16 16 13 16 16 16 13 16 17.2
125 FORSYTH SAWNEE ES 210 21 19 16 20 19 25 11 10 19 25 11 10 17.2
126 APS CHARLES R DRE 135 28 16 28 32 21 4 10 16 21 4 10 16 17.1
127 FULTON RIVER EVES ES 132 21 15 18 12 21 16 16 16 21 16 16 16 17.1
128 COWETA BROOKS ES 114 27 16 25 34 8 10 11 22 8 10 11 22 17.0
129 CHEROKEE BASCOMB ES 187 25 17 21 22 11 19 9 19 11 19 9 19 16.9
130 BRYAN DR GEORGE WASH 495 14 20 15 18 14 20 15 18 16.9
131 APS KINDEZI 28 24 17 14 14 26 7 15 19 26 7 15 19 16.9
132 GWINNETT HARRIS ES 152 23 17 23 15 19 17 13 14 19 17 13 14 16.7
133 PAULDING BURNT HICKORY 162 13 23 21 24 14 15 7 23 14 15 7 23 16.7
134 APS ATLANTA CLASSIC 54 24 11 22 6 35 4 13 17 35 4 13 17 16.7
135 MADISON ILA ES 65 13 12 13 35 16 18 7 22 16 18 7 22 16.7
136 CHEROKEE INDIAN KNOLL 157 18 17 17 20 10 23 15 16 10 23 15 16 16.6
137 DEKALB THE GLOBE ACADE 65 34 19 29 7 14 19 16 6 14 19 16 6 16.6
138 DEKALB SAGAMORE HILL 59 25 7 25 16 10 22 15 17 10 22 15 17 16.6
139 COWETA CANONGATE ES 92 21 9 24 22 13 17 13 19 13 17 13 19 16.6
140 APS RIVERS ES 100 17 10 15 19 26 14 13 16 26 14 13 16 16.5
141 BRANTLEY HOBOKEN ES 78 8 9 20 24 9 10 29 21 9 10 29 21 16.5
142 DOUGLAS MIRROR LAKE ES 91 15 12 18 21 6 18 18 24 6 18 18 24 16.4
143 DOUGLAS HOLLY SPRINGS 86 14 10 10 18 16 21 16 19 16 21 16 19 16.4
144 FULTON BIRMINGHAM FA 130 22 23 24 26 20 19 7 5 20 19 7 5 16.4
145 COLUMBIA BLUE RIDGE ES 117 27 21 29 27 9 14 10 12 9 14 10 12 16.2
146 FORSYTH MIDWAY ES 104 18 19 14 9 18 21 12 16 18 21 12 16 16.1
147 FORSYTH COAL MOUNTAIN 113 19 24 27 22 22 20 7 2 22 20 7 2 16.1
148 COLUMBIA RIVERSIDE ES 104 20 16 18 9 8 17 16 24 8 17 16 24 16.1
149 BULLOCH S ZETTEROWER ES 78 10 9 16 14 12 18 13 29 12 18 13 29 16.1
150 LUMPKIN BLACKBURN ES 120 12 9 13 16 19 14 15 24 19 14 15 24 16.1
151 COLUMBIA EVANS ES 116 12 12 18 11 10 18 17 26 10 18 17 26 16.0
152 DEKALB ASHFORD PARK 69 24 16 25 38 9 11 9 14 9 11 9 14 15.9
153 COBB DAVIS ES 101 26 12 19 14 16 10 10 23 16 10 10 23 15.8
154 COBB BAKER ES 124 14 9 10 9 18 22 14 19 18 22 14 19 15.8
155 COBB KINCAID ES 107 24 11 22 16 21 22 5 10 21 22 5 10 15.8
156 BREMEN CITY JONES ES 162 11 9 21 22 15.7
157 DEKALB BRIARLAKE ES 62 20 9 22 12 20 18 15 10 20 18 15 10 15.6
158 ROCKDALE LORRAINE ES 113 20 16 16 22 14 14 14 16 14 14 14 16 15.6
159 CHEROKEE MACEDONIA ES 147 20 13 14 16 19 13 11 18 19 13 11 18 15.6
160 GWINNETT TRIP ES 160 20 12 16 20 25 13 8 15 25 13 8 15 15.6
161 FORSYTH MATT ES 182 24 20 19 17 19 19 7 9 19 19 7 9 15.5
162 LUMPKIN LUMPKIN ES 88 16 12 17 21 17 17 13 13 17 17 13 13 15.5
163 GWINNETT PATRICK ES 144 19 12 18 12 14 23 7 19 14 23 7 19 15.5
164 OCONEE COLHAM FERRY ES 85 15 15 21 12 21 12 15 13 21 12 15 13 15.4
165 GWINNETT DACULA ES 212 16 12 16 21 16 16 13 16 16 16 13 16 15.4
166 CLARKE BARNETT SHOAL 69 18 14 20 18 13 19 14 13 13 19 14 13 15.4
167 FAYETTE HUDDLESTON ES 111 13 12 9 15 15 18 18 18 15 18 18 18 15.4
168 COLUMBIA LEWISTON ES 136 16 10 14 12 8 17 13 28 8 17 13 28 15.3
169 COBB KEHELEY ES 80 20 9 19 11 21 19 11 11 21 19 11 11 15.3
170 COBB ROCKY MOUNT ES 101 19 15 11 22 26 10 9 13 26 10 9 13 15.3
171 WALTON BAY CREEK ES 116 11 8 15 22 24 16 4 19 24 16 4 19 15.3
172 GWINNETT WALNUT GROVE ES 145 19 12 21 14 21 9 11 18 21 9 11 18 15.2
173 PIERCE PATTERSON ES 64 19 24 19 30 8 16 11 10 8 16 11 10 15.2
174 GWINNETT WOODWARD MILL 166 21 8 16 14 16 17 13 16 16 17 13 16 15.1
175 COWETA WILLIS ROAD ES 116 18 14 16 20 18 9 14 15 18 9 14 15 15.1
176 DEKALB LIVSEY ES 50 20 14 29 19 20 15 12 2 20 15 12 2 15.0
177 JEFFERSON CITY JEFFERSON ACA 240 16 11 11 21 10 21 9 19 10 21 9 19 15.0
178 MADISON COMER ES 63 15 16 16 30 5 9 11 27 5 9 11 27 14.9
179 TROUP HOLLIS HAND ES 91 14 7 24 29 15 9 11 17 15 9 11 17 14.9
180 CARROLL ROOPVILLE ES 64 13 10 22 37 9 14 11 14 9 14 11 14 14.8
181 GWINNETT JACKSON ES 297 13 11 14 10 20 15 12 19 20 15 12 19 14.8
182 COBB DUE WEST ES 103 24 11 19 20 25 11 5 10 25 11 5 10 14.7
183 PIERCE MIDWAY ES 77 17 13 31 27 10 14 13 8 10 14 13 8 14.7
184 GWINNETT ARCADO ES 201 15 11 12 8 19 20 11 15 19 20 11 15 14.7
185 BIBB SPRINGDALE ES 87 12 12 21 15 25 13 4 18 25 13 4 18 14.7
186 FAYETTE OAK GROVE ES 66 11 9 20 15 18 20 12 11 18 20 12 11 14.7
187 BUFORD CITY BUFORD ACADEM 306 21 13 11 13 7 22 14 16 7 22 14 16 14.6
188 BULLOCH BROOKLET ES 100 16 13 18 25 16 13 15 8 16 13 15 8 14.5
189 COBB EASTVALLEY ES 96 17 9 14 3 21 21 12 11 21 21 12 11 14.5
190 COBB KING SPRINGS 138 26 11 18 14 19 8 12 12 19 8 12 12 14.4
191 GWINNETT STARLING ES 176 18 12 19 17 19 13 7 15 19 13 7 15 14.4
192 GWINNETT PHARR ES 112 18 15 13 17 13 17 12 12 13 17 12 12 14.3
193 FAYETTE INMAN ES 102 15 12 13 13 18 14 14 15 18 14 14 15 14.3
194 HOUSTON KINGS CHAPEL 72 25 20 31 38 1 7 10 11 1 7 10 11 14.3
195 COBB KENNESAW CHAR 135 17 5 11 5 17 19 11 20 17 19 11 20 14.3
196 DEKALB LAUREL RIDGE 64 22 9 21 13 26 5 13 10 26 5 13 10 14.3
197 COLUMBIA WESTMONT ES 93 16 9 17 17 12 7 16 20 12 7 16 20 14.2
198 PICKENS HILL CITY ES 82 6 5 10 15 12 18 20 18 12 18 20 18 14.2
199 COBB VAUGHAN ES 99 26 11 16 6 21 16 7 11 21 16 7 11 14.2
200 COBB BELLS FERRY E 111 26 15 13 20 14 9 9 17 14 9 9 17 14.2

enlarge   View All 1260 Georgia Elementary Schools Distinguished Learners Milestone Results

Beginning Learners do not yet demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified in Georgia’s content standards. The students need substantial academic support to be prepared for the next grade level or course and to be on track for college and career readiness.

Developing Learners demonstrate partial proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified by Georgia’s content standards. The students need additional academic support to ensure success in the next grade level or course and to be on track for college and career readiness.

Proficient Learners demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified in Georgia’s content standards. The students are prepared for the next grade level or course and are on track for college and career readiness.

Distinguished Learners demonstrate advanced proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level/course of learning, as specified in Georgia’s content standards. The students are well prepared for the next grade level or course and are well prepared for college and career readiness.

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Georgia High Schools Ranked By Milestones Results

All the high schools in Georgia are ranked by their Milestones testing results and Cobb County seems to be the place to be for education.  Pope HS, Walton HS and Lassiter HS in Cobb County graduated 1,469 students in 2015 and all 3 high schools ranked in the top 10 high schools in Georgia.

Smaller schools like the Gwinnett’s School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology came in first and Richmond’s Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School came in second by having the highest percentage of students score proficient on Georgia’s new standardized high school test.

Goto Milestones – All Georgia High Schools Ranked by Proficiency to see all 445 high school rankings.

System School 2015 Total Graduated Proficienct Students
1 GWINNETT GWINNETT SCHOOL 184 94%
2 RICHMOND DAVIDSON MAGNET 109 87%
3 GREENE LAKE OCONEE CH 80%
4 MUSCOGEE COLUMBUS HIGH 264 80%
5 COBB LASSITER HIGH 467 75%
6 DEKALB DEKALB SCHOOL 54 71%
7 COBB WALTON HIGH 602 71%
8 COBB POPE HIGH 400 69%
9 FULTON FULTON SCI HS 45 68%
10 FAYETTE MCINTOSH HIGH 354 67%

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Georgia Milestones – Metro Atlanta Results

The scores for Georgia’s first-ever Milestones tests are out, and many students struggled to pass.

Students in districts with high poverty struggled the most. For instance, in DeKalb County 43.7 percent failed third grade English while in Atlanta Public Schools 41.3 percent failed. In other major metro districts — Cobb, Fulton and Gwinnett counties — about a quarter of that group failed.

Dana Rickman, a researcher with the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education, said the increased failure rate is consistent with what national assessments have been saying for years: that the old tests were too easy.

“We knew [pass rates] were going to go down,” Rickman said. Georgia’s new test results are more reflective of what the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), the so-called “gold standard” test given to a sample of U.S. students, has been saying: that the pass rates on Georgia’s old tests were inflated.

DeKalb County Board of Education rep, Stan Jester, had this to say about Georgia Milestones Results:

How did DeKalb elementary and middle schools stack up against the other big 8 metro school districts?  Well … at least we’re not Clayton.

Percentage of students prepared for the next grade level
The following graphs illustrate the percentage of students that demonstrate at least proficiency in the knowledge and skills necessary at this grade level and are prepared for the next grade level course.

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